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  • The attack lasted about 15 seconds before being blocked, delivering 15.3 million requests per second.
  • HTTPS requests were used to deliver the attack, significantly increasing its strength.
  • The attack originated from 112 countries, with about 15 percent of the payload being delivered from Indonesia.

Content-delivery network Cloudfare recently blocked one of the most powerful distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks ever recorded. The attack lasted about 15 seconds and was imposed onto an unnamed cryptocurrency launchpad, a platform utilized to help fund decentralized finance projects.

The attack delivered 15.3 million requests per second, which falls just short of the record-holding attack (17.2 million requests per second) according to WIRED. However, the recent attack is more powerful than the record holder as it was delivered via HTTPS requests instead of HTTP requests. HTTPS requests place a significantly larger amount of strain on a computer system, resulting in more damage.

Delivering a DDoS attack using HTTPS requests requires greater resources, providing evidence that the threat actors and organizations responsible for DDoS attacks are becoming stronger. The recent attack originated from 112 countries, with about 15 percent of the payload being delivered from Indonesia, which is followed by Russia, Brazil, India, Colombia, and then the United States.

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Cloudflare researchers Omer Yoachimik and Julien Desgats wrote, “Within those countries, the attack originated from over 1,300 different networks.” They clarified that the flood of traffic mainly came from data centers, as DDoSers have begun to stray from residential network ISPs in favor of cloud computing ISPs.