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  • Researchers created nanobots composed of DNA and proteins, which are being called “autonomous molecular machines”.
  • They’re capable of transferring not only DNA information, but just about any possible combination of protein.
  • Eventually, these autonomous molecular machines can be programmed to hunt down and eliminate undesirable cells within our bodies.

Imagine injecting a slew of tiny robots into your body for the purpose of fighting off disease and illness. While the scene has been depicted in countless science fiction films, it may soon become reality thanks to recent developments in scientific technology.

A team of researchers in Australia have developed a prototype nanobot that could be used in future healthcare and medical applications, The Next Web reports. The team released a research paper explaining their process and findings, which states, “Inspired by biology, we design and synthesize a DNA origami receptor that exploits multivalent interactions to form stable complexes that are also capable of rapid subunit exchange.”

The nanobots, which are being called “autonomous molecular machines”, are miniscule devices composed of DNA and proteins. They’re capable of transferring not only DNA information, but just about any possible combination of protein.

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Eventually, these autonomous molecular machines can be programmed to hunt down and eliminate undesirable cells within our bodies, such as bacteria, cancer, and viruses. The nanobots could even be used to make molecular computer systems, which are stored in the body. Once in position, the machines can build and maintain internal bio-factories which create nanobots out of ingested proteins, better protecting the person from disease and illness.