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  • The device generates power through human movement and is made entirely of recycled waste materials.
  • Triboelectric Nanogenerators (TENGs) in the device pull energy from movement in a process known as electrostatic induction.
  • The team behind the device intend to use the technology in smart watches, with future potential uses including the medical and security industries.

The future of wearable gadgets appears to be green, thanks to a new energy-harvesting wrist device developed at the University of Surrey. The device generates power through human movement and is made entirely of recycled waste materials.

According to a research report published in ScienceDaily, the device is made from discarded paper wipes and plastic cups, and is capable of transmitting morse code. The team behind the device’s creation intend to use the technology in smart watches.

The device utilizes a material called Triboelectric Nanogenerators (TENGs) to produce power. TENGs use a static charge to pull energy from movement, a process known as electrostatic induction. The material becomes electrically charged when coming into contact with each other, providing a sustainable method of generating power.

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Dr. Bhaskar Dudem, a Research Fellow at the University of Surrey’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI) and project lead for the device, stated, “It won't be long until we have to ask ourselves which of the items we own are not connected to the internet. However, the current internet-of-things (IoT) revolution highlights the simple fact that our planet doesn't have the raw resources to continue to make these devices which are in such high demand.”

In regards to energy-friendly wearable devices, Dr. Dudem added, "Our research demonstrates that there is a path to creating sustainable technology that runs on electricity powered by us, the users of that technology."